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Maggie Fox is the Senior Vice President of Digital Marketing at SAP, responsible for delivering a unified digital experience to SAP customers and the market globally. Prior to joining SAP, Fox was founder and CEO of Social Media Group, established in 2006 and one of the world's most highly respected independent agencies helping businesses navigate the socially engaged Web. She has been interviewed about social and digital trends by Inc. magazine, The Washington Post, CBC Radio, The Globe and Mail, CBC News, CTV News and The Financial Post, among others. In 2011, The National Post named her one of Canada's Top Innovators. Fox sits on the boards of GetElevate.com and the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

7 responses to “Why we decided to offer unlimited vacation at Social Media Group”

  1. Work / Life Balance? It doesn’t! | Weifarer's Wanderings

    [...] Why we decided to offer unlimited vacation at Social Media Group (enterpriseirregulars.com) [...]

  2. Janet Sunderland

    Thank you for offering a sane possibility in an overstressed world. I’m putting your link on my site too!

  3. Jeanne

    I love the idea of unlimited vacation time but somebody has to be responsible and show up for work. We have a small family business that sells used automobiles and services them.

    Today is an excellent example of what I am talking about. Everyone decided that they needed the day off for one reason or another. One mechanic wanted the day off to go hunting, one owner took the day off because his wife is a teacher and she didn’t have school today, one detailer took the day off so she could drive the tractor while her Dad picked corn, another mechanic took the afternoon off because he had some farm work to do and another mechanic took the day off to go fishing. That left us with a skeleton crew for work today of five instead of ten on one of our busiest days of the week.. We survived but it makes it hard on everyone who is left at work.

    I’ve always been in favor of giving an employee the day off if they ask for it regardless of whether it will make us short handed. Once they have asked for the day off, if you tell them no, in most cases you would have been better off to let them have it off because their heart is not into working when they really wanted the day off.

    How do you organize the unlimited vacation so there is someone left to work? What if someone decides they like their vacation time more than work? Do you fire them? Who polices it?

  4. maggiefox | Social Media Group

    @Jeanne – our policy is very straightforward:

    1. You are responsible for your own mental health
    2. You are accountable to your colleagues
    3. You are accountable to your clients

    Whether you have unlimited time off or not, scheduling vacation appropriately is a management challenge that any business needs to master. People can’t just take time off if there will be negative impact – it needs to be planned for. The freedom is that if they’ve been working very hard, they can grab a day or two (or longer) without ruining plans for the family vacation they had scheduled for the spring, take time throughout the year, work like maniacs for a year and take a chunk of time off. The flexibility is what works for our staff.

    I’ll also add that it’s not for every business.

  5. Doing what it takes « Broken Brain – Brilliant Mind

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  6. The alternative to life-balance is pure awesomeness | BrainyFeet

    [...] Why we decided to offer unlimited vacation at Social Media Group (enterpriseirregulars.com) [...]

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