Well-known expert on why IT projects fail, CEO of Asuret, a Brookline, MA consultancy that uses specialized tools to measure and detect potential vulnerabilities in projects, programs, and initiatives. Also a popular and prolific blogger, writing the IT Project Failures blog for ZDNet. Frequently quoted by the press on topics related to IT management.
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3 responses to “Three tips for Social CRM adoption”

  1. Three tips for Social CRM adoption – _Hosted UniverseThe reference for the cloud

    […] Three tips for Social CRM adoption […]

  2. Chris Butler

    Wow – I am gobsmacked (British word – pretty self-explanatory)

    Here we are, in the infancy of Social CRM as a concept and the very infancy (if I can use the term) of Social CRM as ‘some technology’ and here we are… a ‘reasons why it fails’ message.

    I am taken-aback more than a little because right now, as an industry, we don’t even really know what it is let alone why it fails. There is no single vendor out there right now, definitely including us, who can say, ‘we are a one-stop Social CRM shop’ quite simply because we either don’t know what we need on the shelves or if we do know, we haven’t stocked it yet.

    The points above could have the word ‘social’ deleted and make sense any time in the last 15 years for CRM or you could swap ‘Social CRM’ for pretty much anything else and it would hold true also. It is certain that they may be reasons why Social CRM projects MAY fail in the future…but I challenge the authors to present some cases. Show me some full blooded wall-to-wall Social CRM implementations that have failed, well, at all! That of course may be because no-one has a wall-to-wall solution yet?

  3. Michael Krigsman

    Chris, thanks for your comment.

    To avoid failure, and achieve success, we must think through what can do wrong. The issues I raised in this post bear the test of historical truth — as you pointed out, these are common issues that happen all the time.

    Let’s remind people about lessons from the past, in the hope they will be more successful in the future.