Leading independent voice, analyst, end-user HRM business/delivery system strategyconsultant, vendor HR technology/HRO business strategy/platform architecture/object model consultant, and thought leader across the HRM/HR technology/HR outsourcing industry now is the 23rd year of her solo practice, Bloom & Wallace. You can learn more about Naomi's work and thinking at In Full Bloom.
LinkedIn Twitter

3 responses to “What’s True SaaS And Why The Hell Should Customers Care?”

  1. There’s True SaaS, And Then There’s SaaS InFullBloom

    [...] In my last post, I provided a minimum definition of true SaaS and described the potential benefits for both vendors and customers who adhere to this now well-established concept in enterprise software.  But the potential benefits are only realized as vendors move from delivering the basics of true SaaS to what I call SaaS InFullBloom, so perhaps I should trademark that phrase.  Unlike the minimalist definition of true SaaS, knowing what else goes into achieving SaaS InFullBloom depends on the nature of the applications, the target market, the scope of functionality to be delivered, the geography and industry-specific readiness to take advantage/access specific capabilities, and many more factors.  That said, there really are a core of preferred architectural behaviors which, taken together, separate garden variety true SaaS from great SaaS, aka SaaS InFullBloom. [...]

  2. There’s True SaaS, And Then There’s SaaS InFullBloom | Leomoo.com

    [...] In my last post, I provided a minimum definition of true SaaS and described the potential benefits for both vendors and customers who adhere to this now well-established concept in enterprise software.  But the potential benefits are only realized as vendors move from delivering the basics of true SaaS to what I call SaaS InFullBloom, so perhaps I should trademark that phrase.  Unlike the minimalist definition of true SaaS, knowing what else goes into achieving SaaS InFullBloom depends on the nature of the applications, the target market, the scope of functionality to be delivered, the geography and industry-specific readiness to take advantage/access specific capabilities, and many more factors.  That said, there really are a core of preferred architectural behaviors which, taken together, separate garden variety true SaaS from great SaaS, aka SaaS InFullBloom. [...]

  3. Alex Yee

    I believe that the SaaS provider’s Software architecture with a single code base and data structures, including metadata structures, shared by all customers, must be enormously flexible to adapt to unique business process requirements in the user interface, the workflow, and reporting.
    How is that accomplished cost effectively? Or does the SaaS vendor force the customer to adapt to its software architecture–just like the traditional ERP vendors do today?