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Industry Analyst, Consultant and author, former programmer, systems analyst with 25 years experience. Spent three years in Europe as an industry analyst and as Correspondent for Information Week and other industry publications. Regularly consults with leading public and private enterprise software, database, and infrastructure companies. An award-winning columnist for leading IT and business magazines, Josh is widely quoted in the trade and business press and he blogs at Enterprise Matters.

6 responses to “The cool kids grow up: Box.com and the SharePoint Shift”

  1. Brad

    I agree! If you can’t beat them, join them! I’m a SharePoint consultant and I use box.com all the time. I have yet to try SkyDrive, but that’s only because Box.com was there first for me and that’s what I’m comfortable with. That’s not to say I won’t use SkyDrive. I probably will, especially since SharePoint 2013 is heavily integrated with it.

    I find the comparison between SharePoint and Box.com interesting. SharePoint is seen by many as just a ‘document sharing’ tool, but it is way more than that. Features like workflows, reporting, enterprise searching, metadata management, etc…not to mention the ability to completely customize it to do whatever you wish make SharePoint a true enterprise tool.

    The next version, 2013, is heavily device friendly as well. It just makes Box.com a little less attractive in my mind, but if they can tie in to SharePoint and allow users to access content without having to go through the ‘big evil corporate firewall’ then they might have something going there.

    Thanks for the article…interesting topic for sure!

  2. David

    If you think Aaron Levie is cool, you need to get out more….

  3. SharePoint Daily » Blog Archive » Measuring SharePoint Projects and Governance; Microsoft’s Profitable Products; Surface Gets Bad Reviews

    [...] The Cool Kids Grow Up: Box.com and the SharePoint Shift (Enterprise Irregulars) Last year, when I attended Box.com’s BoxWorks conference for the first time, I was struck by the outrageous coolness emanating from founder and CEO Aaron Levie, as he stood on stage and ripped into Microsoft SharePoint as the embodiment of all that was evil and useless. It made for great theatre, and outrageous coolness not only set the tone for the conference but also apparently heralded a great year for Box. Not only did the company garner some major investors – SAP, and Salesforce.com, among many others  – but it also began an amazing growth spurt that has catapulted Box out in front of a cloud apps market that is the most fast-moving sector of the tech industry this side of mobile. [...]

  4. Measuring SharePoint Projects and Governance; Microsoft's Profitable Products; Surface Gets Bad Reviews - SharePoint Daily - Bamboo Nation

    [...] The Cool Kids Grow Up: Box.com and the SharePoint Shift (Enterprise Irregulars)Last year, when I attended Box.com’s BoxWorks conference for the first time, I was struck by the outrageous coolness emanating from founder and CEO Aaron Levie, as he stood on stage and ripped into Microsoft SharePoint as the embodiment of all that was evil and useless. It made for great theatre, and outrageous coolness not only set the tone for the conference but also apparently heralded a great year for Box. Not only did the company garner some major investors – SAP, and Salesforce.com, among many others  – but it also began an amazing growth spurt that has catapulted Box out in front of a cloud apps market that is the most fast-moving sector of the tech industry this side of mobile. [...]

  5. The ASPE-IT Blog » Blog Archive » SharePoint & Enterprise Collaboration News, Updated Weekly: October 26, 2012

    [...] The Cool Kids Grow Up: Box.com and the SharePoint Shift – Enterprise Irregulars [...]

  6. Ravi Singh

    Blah..blah..blah.. Box is just a stupid box for files. Box does not support enterprise content management and box is EXPENSIVE….compared to Sharepoint online. As an individual I love “box” as an enterprise I love “SharePoint online”. The cool kids need to get in touch with reality. They have no freaking clue about the price point.