How Much Does Bad Data Cost Your Business? | Informatica MDM

Business-critical data changes all the time. For example, a customer moves, changes jobs, gets married, or changes their purchasing habits; a suppliers moves, goes bankrupt or acquires a competitor; you discontinue a product or launch a new one; or you onboard a new asset or retire an old one.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Silicon Valley’s Role in the Re-Invention of the Disruptive Corporate Innovation Model – by @esimoudis

just discovered this new post from the savvy esimoudis…

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Is Microsoft’s ‘Scroogled’ Era at Long Last Over?

Scroogled’s message is also out of whack with the progressive vision expressed by Microsoft’s new CEO, Satya Nadella, at the company’s recent Office for iPad launch event and Build conference. Nadella isn’t drawing a stark line between Microsoft’s platforms and the rest of the world, and telling prospective customers to choose a side. But that’s what Scroogled–supposedly the brainchild of political adman and Clinton confidante Mark Penn, who Nadella shifted from heading Microsoft marketing to a strategy role–effectively does.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

A data culture for everyone – The Official Microsoft Blog

On Tuesday, I talked about our ambition to enable a data culture for everyone and how our current data platform across Office 365, Azure and SQL Server is bolstered with the announcements we made today: · SQL Server 2014. This release completely brings in-memory capability to all workload – OLTP, Data Warehousing and Business Intelligence. · Analytics Platform System (APS). APS combines the best of Microsoft’s SQL Server database and Hadoop technology in one low-cost offering that delivers “big data in a box.” · Azure Intelligent Systems Service – a cloud-based service to connect, manage, capture and transform machine-generated data regardless of the operating system or platform. This is our Internet of Things cloud service that goes into limited beta today. We are all experiencing the explosion of data driven by ubiquitous computing. We all crave easier and faster ways to turn that data into fuel for insight, and to realize the potential of ambient intelligence for every individual and every organization. Today marks a big step toward, and we’re going to keep moving quickly.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Microsoft Launches IoT Cloud

The next version of the company’s database called SQL Server 2014. The big thing here is that it now  includes in-memory technology. SQL Server is a popular enterprise database. The database industry has been going through an “in-memory” revolution, largely thanks to SAP’s HANA database. ”In-memory” databases can crunch vast amounts of data almost instantaneously. A new cloud service called “Microsoft Azure Intelligent Systems Service” that will host IoT apps that can control all of those sensors used with all of those objects. This isn’t the first such service. Salesforce offers a similar cloud, called Salesforce1. A new product called the Analytics Platform System (APS) that combines Microsoft’s SQL Server database with another trendy database technology called Hadoop. This would be used by companies that want to run their own big data apps in house, instead of using a cloud service.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Microsoft’s new data platform spans Office, Azure, & SQL

Nadella introduced three new Microsoft offerings: SQL Server 2014, Analytics Platform System, and Azure Intelligent Systems Service. Above: The products and services that make up Microsoft’s “data platform.” Image Credit: Microsoft SQL Server 2014, which launched today, is the latest product from Microsoft’s $5 billion relational-database management division. The big innovation with the 2014 version, said Nadella, is that in-memory technology works across all data workloads, accelerating workload throughput.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Time for a Mea Culpa? – by @lcecere #scm

reflections on SCM pitfalls and winning approaches from @lcecere…

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Progress Report – Infor moves to the cloud with innovation and (micro) vertical flavor – by @holgermu

Holger with the analyst update on Infor’s progress…

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Coverity finds open source software quality better than proprietary code |

This is timely given the Heartbleed anti-open source backlash

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Intel’s Q1 solid, but mobile losses weigh – by @ldignan

A different view of Intel earnings, this time mobiel being the culprit. “a new financial reporting structure highlighted how mobile is a money pit for the chip giant.”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Has the European Court of Justice just holed Obama’s NSA data gathering reform? – by @whostu

A story to watch….with global impliations for data privacy etc

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

SAP users rattle sabers over charges for user-friendly Fiori apps – by @chriskanaracus

Temperature on Fiori debate continues to rise, this time with user group heat.

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Gnip and Twitter join forces

Gnip is one of the world’s largest and most trusted providers of social data. We partnered with Twitter four years ago to make it easier for organizations to realize the benefits of analyzing data across every public Tweet. The results have exceeded our wildest expectations. We have delivered more than 2.3 trillion Tweets to customers in 42 countries who use those Tweets to provide insights to a multitude of industries including business intelligence, marketing, finance, professional services, and public relations.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Twitter Agrees to Buy Data Partner Gnip

Gnip is one of a handful of Twitter partners with access to the so-called “fire hose”—the full stream of tweets since 2006, which now average roughly 500 million a day. Gnip then analyzes this information and resells it to its customers. The acquisition of a key data reseller marks a shift for Twitter, which has left such analysis to partners. The company last year received $70.3 million in revenue, or 11% of its annual total, from licensing its data. The deal also shows the value of such data and reflects the growing demand from advertisers for better information.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Twitter Nabs Google Maps Director as Product Chief

Graf appears to have two Twitter accounts — one under @danielgraf in which he has only tweeted two times including today’s announcement. Another account, @wienergraf, has only tweeted nine times in the past five years.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Zebra to Buy Motorola Solutions Enterprise Business

Motorola Solutions’s enterprise business–which produces barcode scanners and multimedia kiosks for stores, among other products—had pro forma revenue of $2.5 billion last year excluding iDEN sales, nearly a third of the company’s top line, while Zebra had $1 billion in sales, the companies said. Zebra—which intends to finance a large chunk of the deal with $3.25 billion in debt—also expects to add about 4,500 employees after the deal is completed. Motorola Solutions became a stand-alone business in 2011 after splitting from Motorola Mobility Inc., which was later bought by Google Inc. for $12.5 billion. The company said a strategic review last year showed that there was more value in focusing solely on its government and public safety communications operations.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

SAP users rattle sabers over charges for user-friendly Fiori apps

With Fiori as well as Screen Personas, which allows users to rejigger SAP screens to fit their preferences, SAP “recognizes that reality,” Scott added. However, “in today’s day and age, that user experience functionality and those enhancements should just be included as part of SAP’s maintenance agreements.” Scott elaborated on his position in an interview. “The average user of SAP every day is not an IT person,” he said. “It’s an accounts receivable person. It’s a person on a shop floor. My impassioned plea to SAP is, help your user community out. Help them run [SAP software] every day.”

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Time for a UX Revolution, Not Evolution | SAP

As a former CIO, one of the biggest and most consistent complaints I heard from my line of business partners was the complexity and difficulty of the SAP user experience. It was one of the things I would apologize about the most, yet I knew there was little I could do about it. Then, in January, I found I couldn’t even escape those complaints in my own home. In a “straw that broke the camel’s back” kind of moment, I recall my wife, who is a tax consultant, spinning her MacBook Air screen around to face me, and with an exasperated and forlorn look on her face exclaiming, “Really?” What do you think I saw? You got it, an SAP screen anxiously waiting for input from another befuddled user.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Thanks, Amazon – we’ll take it from here: SAP muscles in on cloud subscriptions

If cloud is the future of business apps, it looks like SAP has decided to get serious. To help encourage growth, there are no data limits on the new SAP service. On AWS, you were limited to 256GB per server, which made it expensive to scale up. With SAP, customers are being encouraged to run “full” ERP by subscription. Selling its bread-and-butter suite through subscription is meant to further encourage sign-ups, as subscription means – in theory, at least – paying less up-front. SAP switches from a bulky capital (the licence) to a smaller but ongoing operating expense for the customer. For SAP, this means predictable and smooth revenue flow, less subject to peaks and troughs of sign-ups to mega licence-and-support contracts.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Oracle continues PaaS push with database backup, storage cloud rollouts

The database backup service is part of Oracle’s PaaS portfolio and designed to be incorporated as part of a business’s multitier recovery strategy. The service is integrated with Oracle Recovery Manager, allowing RMAN users to continue operating with familiar commands, and also includes client-side encryption to provide end-to-end data security. For Oracle Storage Cloud, the API-compatible system provides access to data through REST and Java, and is touted by the software giant to lower operational costs and boost reliability for storing data backups. Oracle’s push to expand its infrastructure cloud services comes at a time when businesses are looking for portability between on-premise and cloud environments as a differentiator, according to Chris Pinkhan, Oracle’s SVP of product development:

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Oracle’s @LarryEllison has the MOST MASSIVE PACKAGE IN PUBLIC

Billionaire IT baron earns twice as much as the next in line, Disney chief Bob Iger

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Intel Still Looking for Next Growth Play as It Reports Q1

pijmping (chips) ain’t easy. :) Reinventoin is hard.

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

How to become a great consultant – by @applebyj

To me this is how you should approach pretty much every profession these days….

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Does the Internet of Everything need one big company to make it a reality? – by @derek_dupreez

Derek reports (and riffs) on views on the Internet of Things….I think adoption is slow but inevitable….

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Infor posts Q3 profit, ups R&D spend – by @ldignan

Infor’s revamp getting some financial traction… “For the first nine months of fiscal 2014, Infor reported earnings of $93.8 million on revenue of $2.03 billion. For the same period a year ago, Infor reported a net loss of $113.6 million.”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)