The Future of Privacy

Some 55% of these respondents said “no” they do not believe that an accepted privacy-rights regime and infrastructure would be created in the coming decade, while 45% said “yes” that such an infrastructure would be created by 2025. Despite this very divided verdict, there were a number of common thoughts undergirding many of the answers. For instance, many of those answering “yes” or “no” shared the opinion that online life is, by nature, quite public. An anonymous respondent even went so far to say, “Privacy will be the new taboo and will not be appreciated or understood by upcoming generations.” Respondents also suggested that a fluid environment will continue to confront policy makers. Among the common thoughts:

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

​Oracle gets its cloud due: Can it sustain it?

CTO Larry Ellison talked up the cloud portfolio, which is massive and covers everything from infrastructure to applications to platforms. In the second quarter, Oracle’s cloud revenue was $519 million, up 47 percent from a year ago in constant currency. The lingering question is whether Oracle’s 200-plus cloud services equates to a cohesive option for enterprises or just a bunch of things to buy. Frankly, if you’re only aiming to be the No. 1 cloud provider that distinction may not matter. Ellison reiterated that Oracle could give Salesforce a run for No. 1 a few times on an earnings conference call.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Oracle, the King of Cloud? Maybe in @LarryEllison’s world

Claims that cloud will drive Oracle’s future growth ring hollow

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

How Much Will Scrapping ‘The Interview’ Cost Sony? | ITfail Security

A production budget of about $45 million; >> A domestic marketing budget of $35 million; >> An overseas marketing budget estimated between $10 million to $12 million.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

FBI blames NorthKorea for Sony ITfail hack, US weighs response

“The FBI now has enough information to conclude that the North Korean government is responsible for these actions,” the FBI said in a statement on Friday.  The bureau’s statement had been expected earlier this week, but was delayed until Friday. A source close to the discussions told Fox News the government had to first notify various parties, including security firms. 

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

U.S. attributes Sony ITfail attack to NorthKorea

Federal investigators on Friday accused North Korea of carrying out a computer attack against Sony Pictures Entertainment, blaming the Stalinist government for an intrusion that exposed corporate e-mails, wiped out computer data and underlined the cyber capabilities of one of the United States’ top adversaries.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

The pitfalls of becoming an HCM SaaS consultant

Becoming an HCM SaaS consultant sounds nifty – but it’s anything but easy. Fresh off our videocast, two SAP HCM pros who pulled off the SaaS consulting transition share their skills tips, and a wake up call to boot.

Author information

Jon Reed

Jon Reed has been involved in enterprise communities since 1995, including time spent building ERP recruiting and training firms. These days, Jon is a roving blogger/analyst, and also counsels vendors and startups on go-to-market strategy. He



Click on the link for the full text/media – @jonerp

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Bots Now Outnumber Humans on the Web | IoT

But, increasingly, a slice of these online bots are malicious—used to knock websites offline, flood comment sections with spam, or scrape sites and reuse their content without authorization. Gaffan says that about 20 percent of the Web’s traffic comes from these bots. That’s up 10 percent from last year. Often, they’re running on hacked computers. And lately they’ve become more sophisticated. They are better at impersonating Google, or at running in real browsers on hacked computers. And they’ve made big leaps in breaking human-detecting captcha puzzles, Gaffan says.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Apple ‘failing to protect Chinese factory workers’

Apple said it strongly disagreed with the programme’s conclusions. Exhausted workers were filmed falling asleep on their 12-hour shifts at the Pegatron factories on the outskirts of Shanghai.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

New York tops year’s market for IPO s

Alibaba’s $25bn IPO on the New York Stock Exchange in September was a world record, and constituted more than a quarter of the $94.6bn raised in 285 US flotations this year — the highest level since 2000, according to Dealogic. This compares with an average annual equity fundraising of $41bn in the past decade.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Becoming an HCM SaaS Consultant – With Marson and Pazahanick

Becoming an HCM SaaS Consultant – With Marson and Pazahanick

In part one of a two part discussion, Jon Reed of http://www.diginomica.com is joined by Jarret Pazahanick and Luke Marson to get their insights on becoming an HCM SaaS consultant an



Click on the link for the full text/media – @jonerp

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Amazon Unveils One-Hour Delivery Service

Amazon will charge $7.99 for delivery within an hour, with two-hour delivery being free. More than 25,000 items are eligible under the Prime Now program, which is only available to customers who pay $99 for the annual Prime membership.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Progress toward a permanent home in Portland | Uber Blog

Today, we are proud to announce that we have a commitment from Portland officials to create a regulatory framework for Uber within the next three months. If regulations are not available by April 9, the City will allow ridesharing companies to operate while they continue to pursue a long-term solution.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Uber’s fight of California data-sharing rule highlights its bumpy road

Uber argued Thursday that it should not have to turn over ride data in a California regulatory standoff that shows how the transportation service is falling afoul of officials who could threaten its expansion. The issue, which is being heard in a California administrative court and whose outcome will not be known until next year, pits Uber against the California Public Utilities Commission. The CPUC’s approval of new ride-sharing services last year carried the condition that the companies make detailed data about their rides available to the commission.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Uber to halt rides in Portland, Ore., until April; city to drop lawsuit

In a separate statement, Portland Mayor Charlie Hales said he has convened a task force that will create safety regulations for all ride services, including traditional taxi cabs as well as ride-sharing companies such as Uber and Lyft. The task force is expected to bring its findings before Portland’s City Council on April 9, Hales said.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Lyft gets Pennsylvania regulatory nod, not Philly

A Lyft spokeswoman said the company appreciated the utility commission’s willingness to work with it, but that it had reservations about a couple aspects of the conditions. For instance, Lyft hopes the utility commission’s conditions will allow a driver’s private insurance to be the primary coverage during periods when the driver has opened the app but has not accepted a passenger and is not seeking a passenger, spokeswoman Chelsea Wilson said.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

US Judge Concerned Google Antitrust Lawsuit Too Vague

A judge on Thursday said she would require consumers suing Google over its Android smartphone operating system to submit more factual details in order for an antitrust lawsuit to proceed, at a time when the Internet search company faces increased regulatory pressure.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Google Inc. Argues Plaintiffs’ Claims Are Irrelevant in Antitrust Lawsuit

Two consumers of Android smartphones filed a case against Google Inc. saying that the OS requires for the manufacturers of smartphone to restrict competing applications in the market, such as those by Microsoft. Partly this is done by making Google apps the default phone apps. The hearing for the case will be in San Jose on Thursday.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

NetSuite Grabs Microsoft Dynamics GM for CMO Role

Mr. Studer will take on the marketing responsibilities held by the company’s CEO, Zach Nelson, who ran marketing after the departure of the company’s previous CMO, David Downing, in March 2013.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

NetSuite Appoints Fred Studer As New CMO

Former Microsoft Marketing Executive Brings Expertise, Vision to Cloud ERP Leader

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Rise of the car-sharing apps poses threat to auto sector

The rise of the likes of car hire app Zipcar and car-pooling rival BlaBlaCar are expected to present new challenges to mass-market carmakers such as Ford, GM, Volvo, Renault and Volkswagen while presenting fresh opportunities for existing rental networks. Online taxi business Uber is another seeking a slice of the market with its UberPop operation, which links private drivers to passengers, though the U.S. company faces legal challenges in countries including France and Germany.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Uber says it will toughen driver background checks

But critics, including traditional taxi services, argue that Uber does not comply with the same level of screening required of taxi drivers. Published reports say that Uber has lobbied against legislation in several states that would have imposed tougher screening requirements.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Uber Launches Luxury Service in LosAngeles | Tesla

UberLUX offers rides in high-end vehicles — think Tesla Model S, Mercedes Benz S-Class or BMW 7-Series — from Uber’s top-rated drivers. But luxury comes with a price. The base fare for an UberLUX ride is $20 and the minimum fare is $30. Compare that to the base far of $8 and minimum fare of $15 for an Uber Black ride.  Uber has offered LUX as a pop-up option in select cities in the past, but it appears that Los Angeles is the only U.S. city where LUX is currently available.

Why 2015 Will Be Year of BigData: Oracle’s Seven Predictions

“Data is a new form of capital,” Mendelson said. “In fact, you see new businesses today whose business is data. Data provides tremendous worth. Companies like Google, for example, are powered by the value that data produces. “Today we have an index that talks about the value of your brand. In the future, we will see an index that talks about the value of your data. At the board level, companies are beginning to understand that they’re facing new competitors, versus like competitors, and the change is very real. Retailers are concerned about Amazon intruding, banks are concerned about telcos providing banking services on your phone. “At the end of the day, it’s information about people, places and things that will truly differentiate them,” Mendelson said.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

The IIAR Analyst Firm of the Year 2014 | Gartner Forrester IDC Constellation

Said Constellation’s chief Ray Wang (LinkedIn, @RWang0): “We’re excited to be recognised by the analyst relations community for bringing Silicon Valley insights, innovative solutions, and market leading buy side clients together into the broader constellation of research.  It’s always an honour to be recognised and we appreciate all the hard work influence relations professionals face in navigating their organisation’s mission and the mission that industry analysts and influencers play.“

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)