Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 edge hands-on preview

The sealed case and glass back on the Galaxy S6 gives Samsung greater freedom in what it can fit inside the phones, and that means for the first time we have devices from the manufacturer with built-in wireless charging. Both phones support both WPC’s popular Qi and PMA’s fledging PowerMat standards, burying any doubt that your phone will work on any given wireless charging pad. Samsung is also introducing a new Qi charging pad of its own, which will be available in both blue and white colors closer to launch.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Samsung Unveils Galaxy S6 to Answer Apple iPhone 6

Samsung also appears to be pinning more of its software and services hopes on partners like Google Inc., Facebook Inc. and Microsoft Corp. , all of which will get prominent placement on Galaxy S6 devices as Samsung pulls many of its own apps. Perhaps most importantly for Samsung’s attempts to reverse its sliding profits is what’s inside the device: application processors developed entirely in house rather than chips from Qualcomm Inc., giving Samsung more control over almost all the components in its handset.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

CXO-Talk: John Gallant, Chief Content Officer, IDG Communications – via @mkrigsman + @valaafshar

CXO talk rolls on….

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Technology outsourcers learn to ride the cloud – by @joemckendrick

“The impact of cloud on the whole IT outsourcing landscape cannot be over-emphasized. The question is: what kind of impact are we talking about?”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Twitter’s Latest Anti-Harassment Measures Still Don’t Do The Trick

“Twitter has taken some additional steps to help users deal with online harassment, it announced Thursday. Too bad they still fall well short of what’s needed.”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

@HP CFO: more layoffs – via @dbmoore

“P’s massive layoffs will continue beyond 55,000 people, thanks to its plans to separate into two huge companies, CFO Cathie Lesjak indicated on Tuesday.”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

L’Oreal explores B2B2C dynamics with SkinCeuticals – by @philww

“By providing practice management software as a service to clinicians, SkinCeuticals can get closer to consumers without disrupting the B2B2C dynamics”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Salesforce Service Cloud, Analytics Cloud Power Fast Growth – by @dhenschen

“Salesforce claims its Service Cloud is ousting SAP and Oracle while the Wave Analytics Cloud is driving seven- and eight-figure deals.”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Oracle sues Kitzhaber staffers over Cover Oregon ITfail debacle; may go after Kitzhaber next

Oracle is bringing new meaning to the words “scorched earth.” The giant software company opened a new front Thursday in its legal battle with the state of Oregon filing a new $23 million lawsuit against a coterie of Kitzhaber staffers and campaign insiders. And the former Governor may be next. Oracle filed notice with the state on Feb. 26 that it is considering similar lawsuits against Kitzhaber and Mike Bonetto, his former chief of staff.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

ITfail: Oracle lawsuit: Kitzhaber advisers manipulated Cover Oregon

In the new lawsuit filed in Multnomah County Court, Oracle alleges that, despite initial failures, the portal could have fully launched in early 2014. It didn’t launch, it says, because consultants with Kitzhaber’s 2014 re-election campaign manipulated the state to shut down the exchange. The company alleges this was done to protect Kitzhaber, a former emergency room doctor who prided himself on health care issues, from political fallout from Cover Oregon’s initial failures. The state officially ditched the Cover Oregon portal last spring and switched to the federal portal, HealthCare.Gov. Kitzhaber resigned earlier this month amid an ethics scandal surrounding him and his fiancee, Cylvia Hayes. Oracle’s lawsuit names campaign consultants Patricia McCaig, Kevin Looper, Scott Nelson, Tim Raphael and Mark Wiener as defendants. They could not be immediately reached for comment. According to the suit, the advisers failed to disclose that they were paid campaign operatives acting to re-elect the governor, rather than policy advisers. Oracle is seeking $33 million in damages.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

VC Kleiner Let Nazre Review Ellen Pao’s Performance Anonymously, Court Hears

Schlein repeatedly told the San Francisco Superior Court he didn’t remember the events that are central to Pao’s case, although he was Pao’s supervisor.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

IBM Pumps $4 Billion Into Cloud, Mobile Initiatives

At an annual meeting with analysts Thursday, the company said it will shift $4 billion in 2015 spending to what it calls the “strategic imperatives” of cloud, analytics, mobile, social and security technologies. The spending plan, in turn, has prompted IBM Chief Executive Virginia Rometty to set a new financial target for those faster-growth segments: $40 billion in combined annual revenue by 2018, or more than 40% of the company’s expected total revenue.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Photos: Google Lifts Curtain on New Headquarters

The plans, created by London design firm Heatherwick Studio and Danish architect Bjarke Ingels, would add about 2.5 million square feet to Google’s existing four-million-square-foot campus in Mountain View, Calif. The additional space would accommodate an additional 10,000 employees, on top of the 20,000 who work at the headquarters complex now.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Putting net neutrality in context

“After much litigation, public demonstration and deliberation, the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted 3 to 2 to adopt open internet rules. While the substantive details of the decision are not yet known, the rules, as expected, reclassified “retail” internet service to subscribers as common carriage – meaning providing non-discriminatory service to customers. Internet Service Providers (ISPs) may not block, impair or favor particular traffic, users or content.”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

How the Military Will Fight ISIS on the Dark Web

“First, while the Dark Web is incredibly valuable as a tool for dissident action, it also has some real dark spots. Ido Wulkan, the senior analyst at S2T, a Singapore-based technology company that develops Dark Web harvesting technologies, recently revealed to Israeli newspaper Haaretz that his company has found a number of websites raising funds for ISIS through bitcoin donations.”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Hadoop Creator: If You Want To Succeed With Big Data, Start Small – by @mjasay

“Though Cloudera sells a vision of enterprise data hubs, he thinks that’s more of an end goal, not the first step. “Don’t try to jump to moving your company to an enterprise data hub,” he declares. “Not at first. Start with a point solution with relatively low risk.” Then grow the solution (and the team’s understanding) from there.”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Is There An Innovation Crisis At US Firms? – by @stevedenning

“Now, in early 2015, as the economy appears to be undergoing a fragile recovery, with the help of cheap government money and various kinds of financial engineering, a new survey from MindMatters conducted this month (to be released on March 3) suggests that many American companies are still in an “innovation crisis.”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

What’s in Store for 2015: A Few Predictions – by @sogrady

“It is equally true, however, that building an open source company is inherently more challenging than building one around proprietary software. This has led to the creation of a variety of complicated monetization mechanisms, which attempt to recreate proprietary margins while maintaining the spirit of the underlying open source project. Of these, open core has emerged as the most common. In this model, a company maintains an open source “core” while layering on premium, proprietary components.”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Why SiliconValley is the new revolving door for Obama staffers

The affinity between the White House and the tech industry has enriched Obama’s campaigns through donations, and it has presented lucrative opportunities for staffers who leave for the private sector. On Thursday, former White House press secretary Jay Carney joined Amazon as its senior vice president for worldwide corporate affairs. Former Obama campaign manager David Plouffe runs policy and strategy for Uber, the car service start-up. And several other former administration officials are peppered throughout Silicon Valley in various positions, lobbying on important policy issues related to taxes, consumer privacy and more.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Hadoop Bubble Watch: The Bubble Quivers As Hortonworks Misses

Hortonworks announced yesterday quarterly results for the first time as a public company and they came below expectations. It had revenues of $12.7 million (up 55% year-over-year), but average Wall Street estimates were $13.42 million. Similarly, Wall Street expected a loss of $2.04 per share and Hortonworks reported a loss of $2.19 per share. The results could be attributed to a company new to the game of providing guidance to Wall Street. But the company’s management had substantial experience in that department throughout their impressive careers so we must look somewhere else for an explanation. What if November 10, 2014, the day Hortonworks filed the paperwork for its IPO was the beginning of the end of the Hadoop bubble, to quote your humble correspondent? What if December 12, 2014, the day Hortonworks went public, surprising many by its swift action, the bubble “began to quiver and shake preparatory to its bursting”? What if Hortonworks had decided to rush to the exit while expectations were high?

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

IDMP Compliance as a Competitive Advantage

The Identification of Medicinal Products (IDMP) standards were developed in response to a worldwide demand for internationally harmonised specifications for medicinal products. The EU is the first to implement these standards, with compliance being set for 1 July 2016.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Big Data Tempest In A Teapot – by @dhenschen

“Hadoop and big data community infighting won’t attract enterprise adoption. It’s time to raise the level of discourse.”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

ACE opens the sluice gates on small-biz CRM – by @jtwentyman

“Low cost and high flexibility were the top priorities when the water-flow control specialist set out on a CRM replacement mission. Could it achieve both goals, without compromising?”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

IBM’s Rometty pitches ‘high value innovation’, reinvention, $4 billion more into growth businesses – by @ldignan

“IBM plans to spend an additional $4 billion on “strategic imperative” units, partner more and innovate in its core businesses. “

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

Why Germany Dominates the U.S. in Innovation

Germany wins hands down. Germany does a better job on innovation in areas as diverse as sustainable energy systems, molecular biotech, lasers, and experimental software engineering. Indeed, as part of an effort to learn from Germany about effective innovation, U.S. states have encouraged the Fraunhofer Society, a German applied-science think tank, to set up no fewer than seven institutes in America. True, Americans do well at inventing. The U.S. has the world’s most sophisticated system of financing radical ideas, and the results have been impressive, from Google to Facebook to Twitter. But the fairy tale that the U.S. is better at radical innovation than other countries has been shown in repeated studies to be untrue. Germany is just as good as the U.S. in the most radical technologies.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)