Microsoft sues IRS for details of probe on internal transactions

The lawsuit, filed in a District of Columbia federal court, says the IRS entered into a contract this year with Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, which specializes in litigation. The agency is paying Quinn Emanuel more than $2 million in connection with its examination of Microsoft Corp’s tax returns between 2004 and 2009, the court filing said.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Google.com Domain Should Be Covered By Search De-Listing, Say European EXTORTIONIST Regulators

[Why is the burden on Google rather than on the source sites??? -DBM] It does not erase any source material from the Internet, as is often erroneously reported.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Twitter App Graph exposes smartphone spyware feature

Spyware isn’t a bug on iOS or Android, it’s a feature.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Dumping Microsoft Office for Google Apps? Test them first

On the surface, it looks like Google has all the bases covered, although from a usability perspective I find the collaborative tools to be clunky. However, that’s my impression of all online applications (Microsoft’s Office Online apps included) — I prefer to work on an installed application if available. Many Google Apps offerings have “good enough” features, but they may not have exactly what you’re looking for compared to Office 365, especially on the admin side (that is, the control over these features). Granted, administering Office 365 gets very complex if you plan on jumping into the Exchange Admin Center or SharePoint Admin Center, even if the initial setup is easy in the Office 365 admin dashboard.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

EXTORTIONIST China charges Microsoft $140m for tax ‘evasion’

It suggested that while Microsoft’s China-based businesses were officially lossmaking, its profits were being booked in offshore tax havens, and claimed that Microsoft had admitted to the tax evasion. However, the US technology company contradicted much of the Xinhua article. It said that it had agreed with Chinese authorities to pay $140m as a “bilateral advanced pricing agreement”, rather than as back taxes.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Twitter to Start Tracking Which Apps Its Users Have Downloaded

Twitter says the reason for the update is simple: It’s trying to learn more about its user base so it can make more money selling ads.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Why does Europe think it can censor Google globally? Privacy regulators in the…

On what legal basis does Europe believe it can censor a foreign search engine company in countries outside Europe? 

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Insight – Behind Google’s Europe woes, American accents

It can sound like sour grapes, the anti-American backlash of an ageing Europe envious, and fearful, of the wealth and growing power of young U.S. tech giants.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Tips for starting out coding for the Internet of Things – by @tomraftery

“We spoke to SAP’s Craig Cmehil subsequently to get hints on how to start out learning about hacking Internet of Things projects at home and he supplied us with a list of resources.”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

HP Posts Q4 Sales Below Expectations; Guidance Weak

“Hewlett-Packard’s fiscal fourth-quarter earnings missed Wall Street’s estimates, and its shares fell by more than one percent in after-hours trading.”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

What I Learned From Building An App For Low-Income Americans

This is very thoughtful stuff, with useful takeaways ” I was lost in the Bronx. It was my first week as a Significance Labs Fellow, where my job was to create a tech product for some of the American households who earn less than $25,000 a year. In 2013, 45.3 million Americans lived at or below the poverty line, which for a family of four is $23,834.”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

How to Explain Net Neutrality to Your Relatives: A Thanksgiving Guide

“Thanksgiving is almost here, and that means turkey, mashed potatoes, and getting peppered with questions about tech-related news stories because hey, you read a bunch of blogs and you even know what a yik-yak is! It’s only a matter of time before they ask you “So what’s up with that thing on the internets?”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

SAP and user group – a chance for a new dynamic? – by @whostu

“The user group wants to see more help coming from SAP to encourage innovation and adoption, something the vendor sees as a work in progress.”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

O’Reilly Survey: Data Scientists Make Good Money but Women Don’t Get Paid as Well as Men – by @mgboydcom

“A survey of the data science tool stacks being used in the workplace reveal that businesses and enterprise value open source tools the most, and are willing to pay a premium for those able to manage data in the cloud. The bad news is that women working in data science professions are being financially penalized for no other reason than their gender.”

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

How to extract a sliver of value from Google Plus – in 7 ways

Google Plus has been dismissed as a failure. But with some tweaks, there is enterprise value to be had. Here’s 7 tips from my recent re-evaluation, complete with links to hidden settings.

Author information

Jon Reed

Jon Reed has been involved in enterprise communities since 1995, including time spent building ERP recruiting and training firms. These days, Reed is a (cough) blogger/analyst and also counsels vendors and startups on go-to-market strategy. He is an SAP Mentor, Enterpris



Click on the link for the full text/media – @jonerp

(Curated by Jon Reed. Read the complete article here)

New life for Aaron Sorkin’s ‘Steve Jobs’

It’s been a bumpy ride. A change of directors. A couple false starts casting the lead. And then a whole new studio. On Monday, less than a week after Sony dropped the picture, Universal Studios picked it up. According to the Hollywood Reporter, which broke the news, it was shopped to Universal — with Michael (Inglourious Basterds) Fassbinder in the title role — for more than $30 million.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Copyrightability of Java APIs revisited | Oracle Google Android

At issue in the Oracle case is the proper interpretation of Section 102(b) of U.S. copyright law. It states that “[i]n no case does copyright protection for an original work of authorship extend to any idea, procedure, process, system, method of operation, concept, principle or discovery, regardless of the form in which it is…embodied in such work.” Oracle asserts that this provision restates the classic distinction between expression (which copyright law protects) and ideas (which are beyond the scope of copyright protection). Because the Java APIs are much more detailed than ideas and may have original elements, they are not ideas alone, but rather expressions of ideas. The CAFC agreed, concluding that these Java APIs are copyrightable because of the creativity they embody and the existence of alternative ways in which Google could have developed its own APIs.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

BlackBerry will give €440 to customers who switch from Apple iPhone to a BlackBerry Passport

The “BlackBerry Trade Up” programme is available only in the US and Canada and could see customers get up to $400 in cash for handing in their Apple phones, as well getting as a $150 prepaid Visa card. However, the amount paid for iPhones will depend on their condition.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Samsung Considering Shake-Up in Management

Broadening Mr. Yoon’s duties could allow Samsung to better streamline its management and help it respond more nimbly to rising competition, especially from Chinese smartphone makers. If Mr. Yoon, 61, is given the nod to take over the mobile division, he could be well-positioned to help Samsung compete in the so-called connected home—a hot corner of tech that aims to link home appliances to the Internet. Mr. Yoon has been one of the main proponents of the company’s push in this direction, and signed off on Samsung’s acquisition earlier this year of U.S. connected-home startup SmartThings.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Microsoft can’t explain why its Surface tablet needs a pen

When it has more than 30 seconds, in its business-directed ads, Microsoft shows off all those things. Most are simple case study advertisements that have schools, businesses, and hospitals showing off how they use the Surface — pen and all. You see architects sketching out designs, along with banks and businesses inking deals by having people sign their names on the tablet. There’s also a too-long-for-TV ad with NFL players and coaches, showing how you could use the pen to draw out plays and take notes during briefings. Again, all that is easy to grok, but hard to squeeze into a 30-second spot. More importantly, it establishes the pen as a tool for specialists, but perhaps not for everyone.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Samsung Galaxy S5 said not selling as well as S4

Samsung reportedly sells 40 percent fewer Galaxy S5 phones than expected during its first three months on sale, prompting a change in mobile strategy and possible management shake-up.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Sony Pictures Reels From Hacker Attack

The group behind the attack calls itself the GOP (Guardians of Peace) and is allegedly holding Sony Pictures’ data hostage. An image originally shared on Reddit shows the ransom screen that the GOP hackers put on the Sony Pictures network. The attackers have also posted several compressed .zip files that include alleged internal Sony Pictures financial reports.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Apple iPad may have first decline ever as tablet market slows | Google Android

While tablet shipments will still increase over last year, the expected 7.2% jump is a huge departure from the 52.5% uptick in 2013. IDC says the life expectancy for our devices has risen, which means less replacements. That obviously means we’re buying less tablets, and shipments/sales will reflect as much. Newer operating systems supporting older devices also contributes. Of special interest in the report is that Apple’s iPad, the one true market leader in terms of tablet shipments, is expected to see a decline for the first time ever. The final numbers for 2014 aren’t in yet, obviously, but the report shows a 12.7% decrease in iOS tablets (iPad, clearly) from last year.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

DT and Informatica service links cloud, on-premises apps, data

European CIOs looking to integrate applications across public and private clouds will soon have a new option with a data orchestration service from Deutsche Telekom and Informatica. With the growing popularity of cloud-based applications, the potential for data fragmentation has also increased, because apps running in-house aren’t going away. To help enterprises address this problem, Deutsche Telekom’s T-Systems unit has joined forces with integration software company Informatica.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)

Oracle bulks up its public cloud with ex-Joyent engineer

At Joyent, Cavage invented its recently open-sourced Manta object-storage service and was also the lead engineer. This hire shows that Oracle means business when it comes to building its cloud infrastructure, but it still has a way to go before it can be an established cloud player.

(Curated by Dennis Moore. Read the complete article here)